Thought: Technology is not scary

It´s always the same. In the last events to which I have attended the speakers dedicate the first third of their “presentations” (I’m going to put it in quotation marks) to get scared with the avalanche – some prefer to say tsunami – of technological tendencies that hover over us.

Serious and respectable sources such as Gartner, Forrester or Techcrunch are cited with infographics in which one ball connects with other balls (such as the Atomium in Brussels, although this is from 1958).

There is often talk of terabytes of tracketed and inferred data but above all of exabytes of tracketed and inferred data (I understand that exabytes scare much more than terabytes). All, of course, multiplying at maximum speed and without any control, just like viruses do in zombie movies.

There is often talk of terabytes of tracketed and inferred data but above all of exabytes of tracketed and inferred data (I understand that exabytes scare much more than terabytes). All, of course, multiplying at maximum speed and without any control, just like viruses do in zombie movies.

Slides are usually shown with icebergs in which, below the waterline are “buzzwords” such as Machine Learning, IoT platforms, AI, Omnichannel Activation, Facial Recognition, and so on. (the great majority in English because of course it scares more).

All of this makes me anxious, so the paper is fulfilling its objective, as the formula is usually: 1. I generate anxiety 2. I tell you how my company can take away your anxiety 3. I leave you my contact details.

The bad thing (for the speaker) is that it generates anxiety in another sense of the desired. It generates anxiety because I’m tired of seeing how you try to get scared with technology. Technology, ladies and gentlemen, is not scary. What is scary are people.

Technology, ladies and gentlemen, is not scary. What is scary are people.

What is scary is that Digital Transformation projects are not undertaken or are undertaken badly. And this has nothing to do with the technology that is developed or implanted or integrated or plugged in… but with the people involved. Whoever has rolled up his sleeves and worked to carry out a Digital Transformation project (really) knows that what makes a project of these characteristics go relatively well (or disastrously badly) are the people who decide and execute the strategy.

For this reason, on many occasions, large companies (size and/or turnover), which have enough resources (money or people) to undertake Digital Transformation projects, choose to “buy” the Transformation outside (by acquiring other equipment or organizations), rather than generating it from inside. Because the people who decide and lead the execution are not prepared for it.

At Genetsis (I’m also going to leave you my contact details but at least I’ve saved you the slides of the balls and the iceberg) we’re working on pioneering Digital Transformation projects in Retail, Consumer and Banking. Although they are very different industries from each other, all the projects seem (luckily) in that all the people involved (customers and suppliers) are prepared and coordinated to face the challenge. It is common for strategic projects of this nature to involve from the outset as a Steering Committee the heads of the areas of Strategy, Marketing, Digital, CRM, Research and IT. All informed, all aligned, and most importantly: without any fear of technology.

So you know, if in the next few days you go to a presentation and they start scaring you with the technology, kindly remind the speaker that Halloween is the end of October. Less trick and more treat.

Genetsis Group

From digital transformation to omnichannel execution.

Genetsis Group

From digital transformation to omnichannel execution

      

      

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